General Classroom Procedures
No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted.   ~Aesop


GENERAL CLASSROOM PROCEDURES

Please send a snack and drink for your child for the afternoon, as the school does not provide them. Soda and candy are not allowed. Milk for snack and lunch may be purchased daily. You can send in money for the cafeteria in a sealed envelope, with your child's name on it. If your child has a negative balance of $5.00, they will be denied snack milk until their balance is current. Some snack suggestions are crackers and cheese, graham crackers, yogurt, raisins, fruit, and granola bars, cheese stix. Please refrain from sending sugary snacks and cookies.

  • Your children will be taught how to fill in the homework planner at the end of each day. That way, you will know just what homework has been assigned. All homework assignments are written on the Promethean board for your child to copy into the planner. As parents, your homework is to sign the planner each night, including Fridays, acknowledging that you have seen the work, and it is done neatly and correctly. Neatness is very important to me.  I LOVE to read your child's work, and neat printing and cursive writing make my job easier. The planner is also the place for you to write any notes to me, and for me to write  notes back to you, as planners are checked daily. **Please note the color of the behavior that your child has made in the planner for that day. These colors follow the PBIS Behavior Plan we have in place.
  • If your child is absent, please send in a note when he returns with my name, student's name, date of absence,  reason for absence, and signature. These are sent to the office. Please call the school by 9:00 a.m. if your child is absent. I prepare missed work assignments to be picked up or sent home on my Prep time each day. 
  • Morning work is assigned and on the desks at 8:30 each day of the week. Each short assignment focuses on one of these areas: Math, Reading, or Writing. Students are required to finish the morning work by 9:00 am each day. If a student is not finished, the assignment becomes part of recess or homework.
  • If your child is struggling with a topic in math or reading, please write me a note in the planner. I will make an effort to reteach the material to your child, present it differently, and give extra practice in school.
  • Your child will need a supply of pencils (not mechanical), erasers, a highlighter, and a sturdy backpack. We supply paper and one pencil a month.
  • Homework is very important to me, and it is assigned nightly, usually math and spelling each night. The students will also have one short reading assignment per week, which practices fluency and allows you to hear your child read at home. Homework helps students make the most of their experience in school. The students receive a red homework folder, with two pockets. On the left is work to be returned, such as nightly homework and signed tests, etc. On the right is what is to stay home, such as notes from the office and completed workHomework serves a number of purposes: to reinforce concepts learned during the day, to establish good study habits, to complete work we didn't finish in class, and make up work if you are absent Any homework not brought back to school the next day is late. The first time this happens students will get a warning and the work is expected the next school day. The second time this happens students will miss recess to finish the work. and the student write in the planner to make you aware that work is not getting completed. There is an assigned recess detention teacher each day. If this becomes a continuous problem we will have to discuss further options. Students may have to miss out on gym, art, music, or some other fun activity so that they can get caught up.  Three incomplete homework assignments usually result in one point being taken off the final average in the subject for the quarter.
  • Reading between home and school is an important part of any reading program. Children are improving their skills as readers, so it is imperative that they read, and read a lot!! Consistent daily reading will improve fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, and writing.  My main goal is for your children to become fluent readers. My other goal for your children is to teach them to read for both information and pleasure, and develop a love of reading.  Therefore, I  ask the children to read 30 minutes a night every night. They can reread chapters from Science, Social Studies, the daily newspaper, a magazine, or just read a fiction or nonfiction book they have at home. By reading 30 minutes a night, they are practicing what they learn in Reading class, and will ultimately be a better reader.

READING IS THE BASIC TOOL IN THE LIVING OF A GOOD LIFE.                                                                                           ~MORTIMER J. ADLER